Seidhepriest


Website: http://www.solarstudios.net - some photos of unusual musical instruments (like native Mexican percussion) there, among other things.

Original music and mixes are here: http://www.soundcloud.com/S-Priest
Classic game soundtrack mixes are here:

http://www.planetdescent.net/index.php?action=media;sa=album;in=23
http://www.planetdescent.net/index.php?action=media;sa=album;in=19
http://www.planetdescent.net/index.php?action=media;sa=album;in=21

Original music only: http://sidhechapel.bandcamp.com

Files here are usually FLAC or wave, 96 KHz/24-bit, mono, except for synthetic effects and live stereo recordings (which are not necessarily samples for synths).

Some information on recording techniques...

Microphone cable is hand-woven silver-plated copper twisted pair with shielding. Line cables are much the same, except straight wiring. This is what accounts for the liveliness, pretty much.

The microphones themselves are usually: MXL 440, MXL 441, AKG Perception 170, AKG D-40, Rode NT5-MP, Shure SV100.

The sound interface is Roland UA-1G, based on AK4556 DAC/ADC.

All recording is done in 96 KHz/24-bit, in a room with acoustical treatment and minimal echoes (there are some "live" areas though and there's gear).

General setup is for both microphones to have gain adjusted until background noise level is equal for both (say, -70 dB peaks). This is for dynamic and condenser, e. g. the condenser usually gets less gain than the dynamic as it's more sensitive. Each microphone then gets panned to the left and right at the mixer, so that each channel gets only the left or right microphone for channel separation and EQ.

Once recorded, the take gets split in two mono channels, one for left, one for right, and each channel is then equalised with an inverse frequency response of each microphone. You can't do this with a regular limited equaliser, but something like Cooledit's FFT filter or the more modern (and cleaner) Spline EQ VST plugin works just fine (60 bands max. on that one). The result is a fairly straight/flat response sound which is roughly equal to the real thing, though not always (ironically, the AKG D-40 produces a better take on a snare without equalising).

A couple interesting techniques:

1. Dynamic/condenser combination - Shure SV100 & AKG Perception 170. This works for any dynamic/condenser combination, though in this case it's a bit sluggish dynamic and a small diaphragm condenser. The condenser picks up a drum's top skin, the dynamic picks up the bottom skin or exhaust. Both are aimed fairly straight or slightly angled. Because the microphones are placed opposite each other, one of the channels has to be phase-inverted.

2. Dynamic/condenser combination at 90 deg. with 2:1 distance ratio. The two microphones are mounted on stands with the dynamic pointing straight, the condenser angled at 90 deg. and pointing to where the instrument will be in space, 10 cm. away in front of the dynamic. The condenser is placed at 20 cm. away from the instrument.

These techniques work for small percussion, and possibly for any small instrument like a pan flute. With larger and more powerful instruments the microphones might have to be placed farther away. The idea though is that with careful placement, each microphone will catch about the same waveform. At 10 cm. for the AKG D-40 (dynamic) and 20 cm. for the Rode NT5 (pencil condenser) and 90 deg. angle there're no or minimal phase differences. They record about the same waveform with no delays/stretching/phase drift. The two waveforms don't have to be aligned or phase-inverted.

Seidhepriest's latest sounds

  • Currently /5 Stars.
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13-inch snare drum sidestick hit. Recorded with Rode NT5-MP and AKG D-40 microphones, directly to a Focusrite Saffire 40 interface.

  • Currently /5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
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  • 4
  • 5

13-inch snare drum sidestick hit. Recorded with Rode NT5-MP and AKG D-40 microphones, directly to a Focusrite Saffire 40 interface.

  • Currently /5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

13-inch snare drum sidestick hit. Recorded with Rode NT5-MP and AKG D-40 microphones, directly to a Focusrite Saffire 40 interface.

more...