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    I need auditory warning with particular features


    Hello, I need to design an auditory warning for an university's project. I have the following features to use,but I m not an expert in this sector and I need help.

    Harmonic Pulse-Pulse Average Pitch Pitch
    Envelope Regularity Interval Rhythm Pitch Range Contour

    Standard Random 150 ms Regular 600 Hz 300 Hz Random
    Standard 10%Irregular 175 ms Regular 585 Hz 230 Hz Random
    Slow onset Random 200 ms Speeding 510 Hz 280 Hz Random
    Slow onset 10%Irregular 225 ms Regular 525 Hz 200 Hz Up/down/up
    Standard 50%Irregular 250 ms Syncopated 500 Hz 275 Hz Down/up x 2
    Standard 10% rregular 275 ms Speeding 450 Hz 100 Hz Up/down/up
    Standard 50% Irregular 300 ms Syncopated 400 Hz 125 Hz Up/down
    Slow offset50% Irregular 325 ms Regular 335 Hz 170 Hz Down/up
    Slow offset Regular 350 ms Syncopated 300 Hz 120 Hz Up
    Slow offse Regular 375 ms Regular 250 Hz 75 Hz Down/up
    Slow offse Regular 400 ms Syncopated 210 Hz 80Hz Down
    Slow onset Regular 450 ms Slowing 175 Hz 50 Hz Up/down
    Slow onset Regular 550 ms Slowing 290 Hz 75 Hz Down

    I would also appreciate some tips in order to do that by myself.

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    pani94 wrote:
    Hello, I need to design an auditory warning ...
    I would also appreciate some tips in order to do that by myself.
    Audacity is a free audio-editor.
    It has tone & noise generators.
    https://www.audacityteam.org/

    Audacity also has language called Nyquist where you can specify how sound will change over time ...
    https://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Nyquist_Basics:_The_Audacity_Nyquist_Prompt

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    Analog Box 2 is also good for this sort of thing. You would have to learn to use it first, but it's well worth the time invested. And by the way, those descriptions don't really tell me anything -- I can imagine many ways to interpret them and none are specific enough to actually produce a sound.

    -- Keith W. Blackwell

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