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  • avatar
    0 sounds
    3 posts

    The part I'm talking about is under 4.a)

    You may Distribute or Publicly Perform the Work only under the terms of this License. You must include a copy of, or the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) for, this License with every copy of the Work You Distribute or Publicly Perform. You may not offer or impose any terms on the Work that restrict the terms of this License or the ability of the recipient of the Work to exercise the rights granted to that recipient under the terms of the License. You may not sublicense the Work. You must keep intact all notices that refer to this License and to the disclaimer of warranties with every copy of the Work You Distribute or Publicly Perform. When You Distribute or Publicly Perform the Work, You may not impose any effective technological measures on the Work that restrict the ability of a recipient of the Work from You to exercise the rights granted to that recipient under the terms of the License. This Section 4(a) applies to the Work as incorporated in a Collection, but this does not require the Collection apart from the Work itself to be made subject to the terms of this License. If You create a Collection, upon notice from any Licensor You must, to the extent practicable, remove from the Collection any credit as required by Section 4(b), as requested. If You create an Adaptation, upon notice from any Licensor You must, to the extent practicable, remove from the Adaptation any credit as required by Section 4(b), as requested.

    It's also seen in the summary at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/:

    No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

    In the more info link you can click on while hovering over that clause in the summary you get:

    All CC license versions prohibit licensees (as opposed to licensors) from using effective technological measures such as “digital rights management” software to restrict the ability of those who receive a CC-licensed work to exercise rights granted under the license. To be clear, encryption or an access limitation is not necessarily a technical protection measure prohibited by the licenses. For example, content sent via email and encrypted with the recipient's public key does not restrict use of the work by the recipient. Likewise, limiting recipients to a set of users (e.g., with a username and password) does not restrict use of the work by the recipients. In the cases above, encryption or an access limitation does not violate the prohibition on technological measures because the recipient is not prevented from exercising all rights granted by the license (including rights of further redistribution).

    I wish Steam didn't fall under this restriction but I'm pretty sure it does.

  • avatar
    3351 sounds
    326 posts

    Hi, I can't do this request directly, but here is some sounds from (wow 10 years almost) some time ago:
    https://freesound.org/people/tim.kahn/packs/4372/
    If you search for my user name and the word "number" there are a few times when this person said the word "number" so you can probably edit them together to meet your needs. It is not possible for me to record this for you though, but I hope this is helpful.

  • avatar
    141 sounds
    19 posts

    Standard impact / thud sound / sound of a wooden drawer or a hole punch. You can also drop or stomp some cardboard boxes to get a similar effect.

  • avatar
    245 sounds
    558 posts

    This is the full legal code of the Attribution 3.0 Unported license:

    https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode

    I can't seem to find refecences to DRM, probably because I'm not a lawyer grin
    DRM is an issue with, for instance, the GPL license, but CC-BY is different.
    Commercial usage (e.g. Steam) would be barred by the Non-Commercial CC clause, and DRM would clash with the Share-Alike CC clause (both of which can always be waived for you by the authors if they agree); but this is not the case with the CC-BY, and who chooses it can't apply any further restrictions of their own choice.

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Anyone able to tell me what this could be?
    https://vocaroo.com/media_command.php?media=s1TnWlNPvimY&command=download_mp3

    Thx in advance!

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Hi there, I am in need of a female voice counting down from 20 to zero. Needs to be in the format " Number one, Number 2, Number 3" Etc
    Many thanks for your help

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    3 posts

    @Breviceps Yeah, thanks, I'll stick to CC0 and non CC Royalty Free licenses elsewhere. If the sound is really unique or I like it a lot I'll get in contact with the creator.

    @copyc4t Crediting is no problem and I already have a credits screen.

    I'm sure most, if not all the people who made the CC-BY-3.0 sounds I want to use don't have any problem with me using the sounds for a Steam game - however, that clause IS in the license and I don't want to open myself up for any chance of a lawsuit, even if it's small.

    I mean - even if the person doesn't personally care about DRM, if you happen to make a game or movie or something that becomes successful, who's to say that person wouldn't try to sue you just to get money out of you?

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Hi freesound community,

    I'm writing the songs for my hobby band and would need two women to speak a short dialogue for the intro of one of our upcoming songs. To give you some context, it's a song about stereotyping people, and labeling them from the little one knows about them. The dialogue in the intro should be somewhat along the lines of


    A: "Hey, what have you been up to these days?"
    B: "Not much, just hanging around with the band."
    A: "Oh really? In what band is your boyfriend in?"

    It should sound casual and preferably english native. Feel free to change the lines to your liking, as long as the story fits (B being in a band and A assuming, that it can only possibly be B's boyfriend's band). The record should be dry (no effects) and as little noise as possible to mix it up with other atmospheric samples. I was thinking of young and high female vocals, but am open to other suggestions.

    Thanks for any submissions in advance
    Thev

  • avatar
    3420 sounds
    513 posts

    An interactive map of emotions, in vocal bursts:
    https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/vocs/map.html#

    more info:
    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2019/02/12/vocal-bursts-human-sounds-communicate-wordless/

  • avatar
    2277 sounds
    2004 posts

    lacaca wrote:
    ... what happens if a user intentionally posts a sound sample that is not his/hers and I use it, and attribute it on my project (not knowing it is NOT the property of the person who placed it on freesound.org

    If you made money from the unauthorized sound, its true owners would be entitled to some,
    even though you used it in good faith.

    [ This is one of the reasons I always use a non-commercial license on my remixes of other Freesounds ].

    The true owners of copyright could have your project which includes their sound, (without their permission), scuppered, e.g. removed from internet-hosts like YouTube, iTunes, etc.

  • avatar
    717 sounds
    166 posts

    Most of the sounds that aren't created by the uploader (usually copyrighted sounds) are picked up on during the moderation process. Though I'm sure a couple of sounds have slipped through at some point.

    As for who would be liable, that's a tricky one (and I don't think there is any precedent for it), but a logical judgement would place the liability on the user that uploaded the copyrighted sound (but with the terrible bluntness of many legal decisions, they would probably place the blame on the user that downloaded the sound and used it).

    Of course, there are a few ways you can check if the sound may be suspicious:
    -See if the uploader has added any information on gear/software used, or location/date in the description. If they have - great! It's probably fine.
    -Most ripped sounds are usually low quality .MP3s, so be extra cautious when stumbling across an .MP3 sound that might be suspicious.
    -Do a quick search of the sound's title on stock sites likes "Pond5" or "AudioJungle", even "YouTube" as well, which may have the source of the sound.

    If you find any sounds that you think are suspicious, or if you find a match of the sound on another website, then do please report/flag the sound on its sound page.

  • avatar
    245 sounds
    558 posts

    Just put the appropriate information about the sound sources in the credits section of your game, as described in the "3.0" column here,

    https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/License_Versions#Detailed_attribution_comparison_chart

    and you'll be fine.

  • avatar
    141 sounds
    19 posts

    Complicated case. My suggestion: Change the sounds to CC0 ones or you need a personal permission from the uploader.

  • avatar
    4 sounds
    1 post

    If you need help making a sound I'll gladly help just contact me. I don't charge anything since this is a free service. Also If you want I can post tutorials on how to make specific sounds. Finally here's a pro tip, get a profile image. It will probably attract more people to your account.

  • avatar
    306 sounds
    75 posts

    This you mean?

    https://youtu.be/Jbnel9wB7Ik

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Hello everyone -

    I have a quick question on burden of proof of ownership of sound samples used this site.

    Aside from following the proper attribution guidelines as mandated by freesound.org, what happens if a user intentionally posts a sound sample that is not his/hers and I use it, and attribute it on my project (not knowing it is NOT the property of the person who placed it on freesound.org) and I end up getting accused of using the sound piece without permission?

    Has there been a case like this before?

    Thanks in advance!

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    3 posts

    I just became serious about game development so I wanted to really research copyright and legal stuff so that I could avoid any legal trouble in the future. And I just wanted to ask about something.

    Can sounds on this website that require attribution (specifically those licensed with the CC-BY-3.0 license) be used in a game that's sold on Steam? CC-BY-3.0 has a clause that prevents works being distributed with DRM?

    If not, that really sucks because I'm planning to release my game on Steam once it's done and I found some really good sfx on here. :/

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Hello,
    I need to find kids voices/sound from this 1-2 second: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_n8c34NF4g

    Like Kid says "Dump Truck" "Sports Car"

    Does anyone know where I can find it (or similar here)?

  • avatar
    17 sounds
    1 post

    Hey there.

    I can help you with this

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Hi all!

    I just want to say thank you for this amazing sound and music library. I am astounded by the generosity and beauty of some of these pieces. However, I do have a tiny request. I have been signed by a Podcast label and need to produce high quality content, which is working thus far. There is one piece missing though... I have a South African accent, so when I announce the title of my show, I sound like a drunken Trevor Noah.

    The show is called “InstaGod”.

    I need someone with an American accent, preferably deep and with a slight vibratory to merely say, “This (pause) is InstaGod - a true crime, real-time investigation docupod about a strange app that might change the fate of the universe forever.”

    And also, “Episode 1” to “Episode 10”.

    I’ll credit the voice artist and I’ll share ad revenue royalties. Kindly inform me if you’re interested ASAP.

    THANK YOU!