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    A software to speed up gunfire sounds without distortion?


    Youtube these days is amazing at speeding up sounds. I am pretty sure that feature is autmatic, I highly doubt there is a person out there who actually tweaks pitches for every new uploaded video smile. Is there a software I can use to do the same? Specifically for gunfire sounds? I am trying different stuff right now and while they do fine with voices, gunfire sounds are all messed up.

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    The PaulStretch VST is pretty good

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    I've checked Paulstretch but it designed to slow the sound, not to speed it up.

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    Audacity's Change Tempo feature does it.

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    cubrman wrote:
    I've checked Paulstretch but it designed to slow the sound, not to speed it up.

    Paul's Extreme Sound Stretch can also speed up sounds

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    In what capacity are you looking to speed up gun sounds? If you are trying to create an effect where gun shots are occurring in a quicker succession, the solution is not to speed up the samples, but to isolate the individual gunshots and align them together in a fashion synced with how you want (accounting for the decay/reverberation of each shot).

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    "In what capacity are you looking to speed up gun sounds? If you are trying to create an effect where gun shots are occurring in a quicker succession, the solution is not to speed up the samples, but to isolate the individual gunshots and align them together in a fashion synced with how you want (accounting for the decay/reverberation of each shot)."

    That was exactly the response I was looking for. And the one I was afraid of smile.

    Can I clarify something? I have taken an automatic fire sound (~30 shots), chopped them into single shots with the same length and then, if I understand you correctly, I should just sequence them in such a way that the resulting automatic fire sound is fast enough for me, right? Here are my questions:

    1. I want to make several variations of the automatic fire sound. In theory, all I need to do is to randomize the order of single shots and I am fine, in practice this approach yeilds very unnatural sound. Have you ever encountered something like this? Is there a solution?

    2. Should I fadein/fadeout the ends of the sounds when I sequence them?

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    Thanks for the clarification, it should have been in the first post wink

    Your general approach is correct; as for the points,

    1. Does your original sample have a lot of ambience reverberation? Because in that case you'd be chopping the reverb as well, which might contribute to the unnatural feeling. If so, you'd need a less reverberated sound to work on. In any case, try adding yourself a very little reverb to your recomposed track, the shortest duration you can, and very low in volume (if you hear it, it's too much); it should act as a sort of "ambient glue" and feel a little more natural. Also, keep the original first and last shot in place, to start from silence and carry on the ambience tail as it was. Another good tool for "glue" is compression, but use it very lightly not to kill the transients.

    As for variations in sound, little touches of phaser and pitch changes may help; played well, they might be enough to make the variations you need without randomizing the shot order.

    2. More important than the fades, make sure your chops start and end at zero-point crossings to avoid clicks; done that, the fade-outs might even not be necessary as the tails will be covered by the high volume of the next shot, and you may just fade-out the final result as you see fit. But if you notice too much ambience build-up in the cross-fade areas, then yes, fade-out the tails until the ambience level is constant.

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