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    Need advice on microphones for a good mobile sound rig


    We are starting a project where we plan on recording a wide variety of sound clips. We will be recording lots of different sounds ranging from nature and animal sounds to rain to golf balls being hit. Also we will be doing some instrument recordings and vocals. I know this is a huge range of sounds that pretty much covers everything that's why we are a bit overwhelmed with the choices and which microphone route we should go.

    We are looking at getting the korg mr-1000 for our recorder but are in a debate about the best mic setup to go with this.

    Would a mic like the rode nt1000 be a good general mic to work for so many different applications or are we going to be better off getting several different mic that we interchange depending on what sounds we are recording?

    Any advice on what setups others have used with the korg mr-1000 and what is the best route to go when planning on recording such a wide variety of different sounds.

    Look forward to the advice.

    CC

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    Generally it's better to use small diagraphm condensers outdoor and large at vocals and some instruments in studio - for both i use something like Shure Sm86 or Shure BG 5.1. They sound good in studio and outdoor. Some versions have battery phantom, so you save batteries of recorder

    sound addictive human being...
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    thanks for the quick reply RobinHood.... Since I am new to this I have lots of questions hope you do not mind.

    The Shure Sm86 is more of a vocal mic thought right? Well it also work for nature sounds and more sound effects type of recording which is what I will be doing a lot of?

    What about the Sennheiser ME66 Short Shotgun with the Sennheiser K6 Condenser Microphone Powering Module? I reqad some good things about this setup.

    How important is it to combine a mic like the ME66 with a Condenser Microphone Powering Module? What are the advantages of this and why is it recommended?

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    Sennheiser's shotguns are very good outdoor but recording vocals or instruments in studio using them it's not good idea. Generally it's better to buy two different microphones, because there's no universal mike for everything - when you want to have first class recording

    sound addictive human being...
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    So as far as recording specific outdoor sounds the Sennheiser ME66 Short Shotgun with the Sennheiser K6 Condenser paired up with the Korg mr-1000 would be a good setup?

    And then if I wanted to go indoors to record vocals, instruments etc I would be better off with a Shure Sm86 or similar mic?

    Will all these microphones work with the Korg mr-1000 or will I need some sort of adapters?

    Also still very curious about my question in my last post

    How important is it to combine a mic like the ME66 with a Condenser Microphone Powering Module? What are the advantages of this and why is it recommended?

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    In studio Rode Nt 1000 is quite better than Shure Sm86 etc. This mike was only not expensive possibility to join indoor and outdoor use.

    sound addictive human being...
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    So the Rode Nt 1000 would be a good option for my studio mic.

    Then possibly go with the Sennheiser ME66 Short Shotgun with the Sennheiser K6 Condenser paired up for my outdoor sounds? Or possibly the Rode NTG3 Condenser Shotgun Microphone?

    Those with the korg mr-1000 should cover most of my bases for a starting rig do you think?

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    What nature sounds will you be recording?
    Shotgun mics are good for recording a certain species of bird or animal, but if you want ambiances such as a chorus of birds, rain, water then you should use a stereo mic.

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